Social Studies

Graduation Requirements

3 credits in Social Studies should include at least .5 credit of World History, .5 credit of US History, and .5 credit of Government. The state requirement for economics will be included in the year-long Government course.

Pathway Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
Honors/IB World History US Government/Econ HL IB History of the Americas (Year 1) HL IB History of the Americas (Year 2)
College Prep World History US Government/Econ PM History of the Americas Social Studies Elective
General World History US Government/Econ PM History of the Americas Social Studies Elective

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COURSES

Freshman
World History
Academic Pathway: Honors, CP, General
Term: year-long course 
Credit: 1 full social studies credit

This course is a study of world cultures and their relation to globalization. Students will gain a historical, economic, and political understanding of events, people, and movements of the Age of Revolution through the present day and how this understanding relates to current world issues. Students can expect to participate in group projects as well as individual research.  Supplemental readings will also be used to expand the scope and depth of information covered.

Sophomore
U.S. Government & Politics/Economics
Academic Pathway: Honors, CP, General
Term: year-long course 
Credit: 1 full social studies credit

The US Government course is designed to give students a working knowledge of all levels of government found in the US, those being federal, state, county, and municipal. Beyond a theoretical understanding of the branches and Constitutional principles, such as republicanism and federalism, students will acquire a practical understanding of how to interface with the government on a local level, including local elected officials, police forces, and legal institutions. Attention will also be paid to criminal law, including such ideas as civil vs. criminal, felony vs. misdemeanor, and a basic understanding of courtroom proceedings. Students can expect to participate in group projects and individual research. The academic rigors of this course are designed to prepare students for the demands of college and students should expect a level of coursework and homework commensurate to this purpose. 

Macroeconomics will be introduced for the purpose of explaining how our economy is becoming increasingly globalized. The basic structures of the market economy, i.e. free enterprise, laissez-faire, free markets, etc. will be studied from historical and contemporary perspectives, as well as how their structures compare to socialist and other economic models. The effects of the economy on individual choices, purchases, investments, and employment will be part of the focus of the class, as well as how these choices relate to Catholic social teachings regarding stewardship of wealth and responsibilities to the poor. This course will also include lessons and activities on personal finance and the effects that choices have on an individual’s daily life and on larger macroeconomics principles. 

Junior
HL IB History of the Americas (Year 1)
Academic Pathway: IB  
Term: Two-year long course 
Credit: 2 full social studies credit

The IB course in the History of the Americas is designed to provide students with the analytical and critical thinking skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in the history surrounding the Western Hemisphere. The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials -- their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance -- and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in an essay format. This course will cover the following topics over two years:  Industrialization and Progressivism (1977-1920); Foreign Affairs (1989-1930); Prosperity, Depression and the New Deal (1919-1941); the Authoritarian States of the 20th Century From Isolation to World War (1930 - 1945); Move to Global War and the Cold War (1945-1991).

PM History of the Americas
Academic Pathway: CP, General 
Term: year-long course 
Credit: 1 full social studies credit

This course is modeled on the SL IB History course curriculum and is designed to provide students with the analytical and critical thinking skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in the history surrounding the United States.  The course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in an essay format.  Historical topics to be studied from the United States perspective include rights and protests, conflict and intervention, societies and transition, independence movements, industrialization, cause and effects of 20th-century wars, cold war.

Senior
HL IB History of the Americas (Year 2)
Academic Pathway: IB  
Term: Two-year long course 
Credit: 2 full social studies credit
IB Psychology 
Academic Pathway: IB
Term: year-long course 
Credit: 1 full social studies credit

This course focuses on the study of human behavior. As an introduction to the field of psychology, this course includes consideration of psychological principles, terminology, major theories, careers, methods of experimentation, and practical applications. Special topics include personality development, problem-solving, group dynamics, and motivation.

Current Issues
Academic Pathway: General
Term: Semester-long course
Credit: .5 social studies or elective  credit

Through readings, discussion, and videos this course offers the students an opportunity to examine current issues that are impacting our world. Through such topics as politics, globalization, global warming, US foreign policy, morality issues (stem cell research, church versus state, economy, etc.), students will gain knowledge of the world around them. This class will utilize many different forms of mass media including The New York Times, local newspapers, international newspapers, and videos. Term papers and other writing assignments will be heavily used in class. 

FACULTY

Mr. Kyle Conrad '15
2015
Government Teacher/Director of Student Life/Assistant Football Coach

VIEW PROFILEkconrad@purcellmarian.org513.751.1230 ext. 220

Mr. Jim Duggan '91
Social Studies Teacher/Sophomore Dean

VIEW PROFILEjduggan@purcellmarian.org513.751.1230 ext. 222

Mr. Sebastian Misleh
Social Studies Teacher/Freshmen Dean

VIEW PROFILEsmisleh@purcellmarian.org513.751.1230 ext. 226