English

Graduation Requirements

4 credits of English 

 

COURSES

Freshman
English I - Freshman Survey
Academic Pathway: Honors, CP, General
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 full English credit

English I exists to stimulate incoming ninth graders’ reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. Students will learn to immerse themselves in different forms of texts eagerly, using close-reading skills to seek real-world connections to the material they have read naturally. They will have ample opportunity to scrutinize, convey and impart their thoughts in writing as they respond to a wide variety of texts. Texts covered include, but are not limited to, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee and Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. Students will view literature using various means, including podcasts, art interpretations, and persuasive and argumentative essays. In addition, the class will build on and hone students’ command of writing mechanics, including basic grammar, sentence-composing skills, and punctuation.

Sophomore
English II - Genre Literature
Academic Pathway: Honors, CP, General
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 full English credit

This course will introduce students to various literary genres -- including the graphic narrative, the slave narrative, speeches, drama, the novel, and poetry -- within and across multiple periods and cultural contexts. Texts being covered will include, among other works, Stitches by David Small, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, and The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros. Students will further develop their understanding of literary terms and critical analysis techniques through class discussions, research assignments, and group projects. Additionally, sophomores will hone their expressive writing skills through various creative writing assignments and explore their reading and writing habits and individual reactions to class texts through journal-writing activities. The course will also reinforce vocabulary development, sentence composing, grammatical awareness, and close-reading skills.

Junior
HL IB English: Language & Literature (Year 1)
Academic Pathway: IB
Term: Two-year course
Credit: 2 full English credits

Students will undertake a two-year course in International Baccalaureate Higher Level English: Language and Literature to expand and grow their literary analysis and critical thinking skills. Students will analyze works of literature -- both fiction and nonfiction -- and non-literary works, such as advertisements, film, and photography. Topics will include Language and Control in Dystopian Literature; The 1950’s - New Approaches to Self and Culture; Language and Mass Communication - The Edited Self; and Love and Identity Across Cultures. Throughout the class, students will explore a variety of themes relevant to their own lives and the lives of individuals in other cultures and periods, all the while honing critical reading, writing, and research skills.

English III - American Literature
Academic Pathway: CP
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 full English credit

CP Juniors will study authors who will advance their understanding of American culture and history, focusing on drama, poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. They will consider the concept of the American Dream with a critical eye and consider whether the American Dream can become an American Nightmare for some Americans. Students will read and consider other works,  The Crucible, A Raisin in the Sun, The New Jim Crow, and “The Yellow Wallpaper” and shorter works such as the founding documents, nonfiction pieces, and poetry from the Romantic period and the Harlem Renaissance. Students will continue to develop skills in writing researched essays, reflective reports, and explanatory and narrative essays. They will end their American literature study by studying the poem from Langston Hughes, “America to Me.” They will create a multi-genre “America to Me” project reflecting on the material learned throughout the year. CP students will often be expected to complete tasks and reading assignments independently for homework; Teachers will also assess CP student projects with a more rigorous rubric. While general students will present a researched persuasive speech, CP students will be required to complete a more fully developed research paper.

English III - American Literature
Academic Pathway: General
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 full English credit

Juniors will study authors who will advance their understanding of American culture and history, focusing on drama, poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. They will examine the concept of the American Dream with a critical eye and consider whether the American Dream can become an American Nightmare for some Americans. Among other works, students will read and analyze, The Great Gatsby, Beneath a Meth MoonThe Crucible, Of Mice and Men, A Raisin in the Sun, and Fences, as well as shorter works such as the founding documents, nonfiction pieces, and poetry from the Romantic period and the Harlem Renaissance. Students will continue to develop skills in writing researched essays, reflective reports, and explanatory and narrative essays. 

Senior
HL IB English: Language & Literature (Year 2)
Academic Pathway: IB
Term: Two-year course
Credit: 2 full English credits
English IV Seminar - College Credit Plus Freshman Composition (Dual Credit Course)
Academic Pathway: CP
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 English credit, high school; 6 college credits through Cincinnati State 

This course brings college-level Freshman Composition into the high school classroom. Students will be taking this course for college credit through Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Throughout the year, students will complete eight academic essays on the following topics: Narrative, Exemplification, Comparison and Contrast, Process Analysis, Division or Analysis, Definition, Argument and Persuasion, and Cause and Effect. Additionally, students will have ten journal assignments per semester. Upon completing this course, students will have developed college-level writing skills, such as incorporating relevant research, understanding MLA format, and organizing essays beyond a 5-paragraph structure, all of which will prepare students for the writing they will be asked to do to complete throughout their college careers. Students will also have the opportunity to hone their analytical and editing skills through daily reading assignments, class discussions, and peer-editing activities.

English IV Seminar - Legal Writing and Activism
Academic Pathway: CP
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 English credit

In the first semester, LWA seniors will learn how to argue well both orally and in writing. We will accomplish these goals by dissecting intriguing fact patterns from both real life and fiction and taking sides on the factual, legal, and ethical issues raised in those fact patterns. We will also use case studies, mock trials, legal research, oral arguments, and other methods to sharpen analysis, logic, and persuasive skills. The course will introduce students to the basic concepts of legal writing. The class will then proceed to study and evaluate different topics of activism (Internet issues, Labor, Human Rights, Feminism, Environmentalism, Global Justice, Racial Justice) and various forms/tools of activism (Social Media, Hacktivism, Strikes, Boycotts, Demonstrations, Gate-Crashing, Culture Jamming, etc.). Students will then develop and present their activist projects and evaluate co-students projects to strengthen them. Students in this class are encouraged but NOT required to participate in the mock trial competition sponsored by the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education, which takes place in late January.

English IV Seminar - Professional Writing 
Academic Pathway: General
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 English credits

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of professional, career-related writing. Students will learn both general employment writing skills -- such as resume, cover letter, and elevator speech writing -- as well as career-specific composition skills. The course will be organized by the employment field, and it will cover a variety of jobs in the business and advertising industries. Throughout this course, students will work to improve their grammar, conciseness, clarity, and organization in their writing through various composition assignments. Students will also be introduced to different career fields and will have the opportunity to explore real-world writing scenarios from multiple jobs. Finally, students will produce oral presentations, researched essays, and practical products that they can take into their careers after high school.

FACULTY