English

Graduation Requirements

4 credits of English 
Pathway Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
Honors/IB Honors English I - Freshman Survey Honors English II - Genre Literature IB English - Language and Literature (Year 1) IB English - Language and Literature (Year 2)
College Prep CP English I - Freshman Survey CP English II - Genre Literature CP English III - American Literature CP English IV - Seminar or CCPlus Freshman Composition
General English I - Freshman Survey English II - Genre Literature English III - American Literature English IV - Seminar

 

COURSES

Freshman
English I - Freshman Survey
Academic Pathway: Honors, CP, General
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 full English credit

English I exists to invigorate incoming ninth-graders’ reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. Students will learn to engage texts energetically, using close-reading skills, and actively asking questions of what they have read. They will have ample opportunity to explore, express, and develop their own thoughts in writing, as they respond to a wide variety of texts. Texts being covered include, but are not limited to, short tales of Greek mythology, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, and Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Students will be exploring literature using a variety of means including podcasts, art interpretations, and homemade videos. In addition, the class will build on and hone students’ command of writing mechanics, including basic grammar, sentence-composing skills, and punctuation.

Sophomore
English II - Genre Literature
Academic Pathway: Honors, CP, General
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 full English credit

This course will introduce students to a variety of literary genres -- including the graphic narrative, the slave narrative, speeches, drama, the novel, and poetry -- within and across a range of time periods and cultural contexts. Texts being covered will include, among other works, Stitches by David Small, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, and The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros. Students will further develop their understanding of literary terms and critical analysis techniques through class discussions, research assignments, and group projects. Additionally, sophomores will hone their expressive writing skills through a variety of creative writing assignments, as well as explore their personal reading and writing habits and individual reactions to class texts through journal-writing activities. Vocabulary development, sentence composing, grammatical awareness, and close-reading skills will also be reinforced throughout the course.

Junior
HL IB English: Language & Literature (Year 1)
Academic Pathway: IB
Term: Two-year course
Credit: 2 full English credits

In International Baccalaureate Higher Level English: Language and Literature, students will undertake a two-year course to expand and grow their literary analysis and critical thinking skills. Students will analyze works of literature -- both fiction and nonfiction -- as well as non-literary works, such as advertisements, film, and photography. Topics will include Language and Control in Dystopian Literature; The 1950’s - New Approaches to Self and Culture; Language and Mass Communication - The Edited Self; and Love and Identity Across Cultures. Throughout the class, students will explore a variety of themes relevant to their own lives and the lives of individuals in other cultures and time periods, all the while honing critical reading, writing, and research skills.

English III - American Literature
Academic Pathway: CP, General
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 full English credit

Juniors will study authors who will advance their understanding of American culture and history, focusing on drama, poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. They will consider the concept of the American Dream with a critical eye and consider whether the American Dream can become an American Nightmare for some Americans. Among other works, students will read and consider, The Great Gatsby, Beneath a Meth MoonThe Crucible, Of Mice and Men, A Raisin in the Sun, and Fences, as well as shorter works such as the founding documents, nonfiction pieces, and poetry from the Romantic period and the Harlem Renaissance. Students will continue to develop skills writing researched essays, reflective pieces, and explanatory and narrative essays.

Senior
HL IB English: Language & Literature (Year 2)
Academic Pathway: IB
Term: Two-year course
Credit: 2 full English credits
English IV Seminar - College Credit Plus Freshman Composition (Dual Credit Course)
Academic Pathway: CP
Term: Year-long course
Credit: 1 English credit, high school; 6 college credits through Cincinnati State 

This course brings college-level Freshman Composition into the high school classroom. Students will be taking this course for college credit through Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Throughout the year, students will complete eight academic essays on the following topics: Narrative, Exemplification, Comparison and Contrast, Process Analysis, Division or Analysis, Definition, Argument and Persuasion, and Cause and Effect. Additionally, students will have ten journal assignments per semester. Upon completion of this course, students will have developed college-level writing skills, such as incorporating appropriate research, understanding MLA format, and organizing essays beyond a 5-paragraph structure, all of which will prepare students for the writing they will be asked to complete throughout their college careers. Students will also have the opportunity to hone their analytical and editing skills through daily reading assignments, class discussions, and peer-editing activities.

English IV Seminar - Gender Studies (Part 1)
Academic Pathway: CP
Term: 1st semester 
Credit: .5 English credits

What does it mean to be a man or woman in America today? Gender Studies is designed for the curious student with a desire to ask questions and think critically about answers. During the fall semester, in Part 1 of the course, students will explore the history of gender in America, with a chronological examination of how race, class, and age have shaped Americans’ experiences since the mid-1800s. We will study a wide range of texts (from essays to scholarly articles to journalism) and primary sources (such as clothing, music, and films). Through extensive class discussion and written reflection, students will connect their individual experiences to broader social and historical forces. 

English IV Seminar - Gender Studies (Part 2)
Academic Pathway: CP
Term: 2nd semester 
Credit: .5 English credits

Part 2 of Gender Studies builds on the historical survey of semester one (see above). During the spring semester, however, we will take a primarily sociological lens to examine contemporary issues in Gender Studies. Students will explore the role of gender (in addition to other social identities including class and ethnicity) in shaping our individual experiences of major social institutions, like education, work, and the family. As with the first semester, students should expect to interact with a range of texts, including journalism, academic articles, and documentaries. Written reflection and energetic discussion will likewise be at the heart of our Part 2 of Gender Studies.

English IV Seminar - The Power of Myth (Part 1)
Academic Pathway: General
Term: 1st semester 
Credit: .5 English credits

What is mythology? Why do myths exist in all cultures and across all times? Why do these stories stay with us for thousands of years? This course explores mythology across the globe, through various eras, and in numerous media in order to identify why myth as a genre is so powerful. It will define myth as a genre and identify some of the key characteristics of mythic storytelling. The course will explore the way myth can be used to examine various cultures as well as the psychology of humanity.

English IV Seminar - The Power of Myth (Part 2)
Academic Pathway: General
Term: 2nd semester 
Credit: .5 English credits

The Power of Myth course will take an in-depth look into J.R.R. Tolkien’s mythic masterpiece, The Lord of the Rings. Using what they learned from the first part of this course, students will be able to analyze the deep symbolic meaning behind the text, as well as analyze the psychological motives present in the story’s numerous characters. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to draw conclusions about the author’s viewpoints on numerous issues and explore how other modern myths make statements about life and society. Students will even have the opportunity to construct their own myth to represent contemporary culture and/or issue.

English IV Seminar - Professional Writing (Part 1 & 2)
Academic Pathway: General
Term: 1st & 2nd semester 
Credit: .5 English credits

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of professional, career-related writing. Students will learn both general employment writing skills -- such as resume, cover letter, and elevator speech writing -- as well as career-specific composition skills. The course will be organized by the employment field, and it will cover a variety of jobs in the business and advertising industries. Throughout this course, students will work to improve their grammar, conciseness, clarity, and organization in their writing through a variety of composition assignments. Students will also be introduced to different career fields and will have the opportunity to explore real-world writing scenarios from a variety of jobs. Finally, students will produce oral presentations, researched essays, and practical products that they can take with them into their careers after high school.

FACULTY

Ms. Ann Wittenauer
English Teacher/Junior Dean

VIEW PROFILEawittenauer@purcellmarian.org513.751.1230 ext. 228


Mr. Anthony Wyatt
English Teacher/IB Team

VIEW PROFILEawyatt@purcellmarian.org513.751.1230 ext. 227